Travel Feature

Nova Scotia's French Shore

French Shore - La Cuisine Robicheau

If you are unfamiliar with the Maritime Provinces of Canada, you might not realize how much took place in the East Coast of Canada during the settling by the French and the English. In the early 1600’s, the French immigrated to the Acadian Provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island). These French settlers that colonized the land and coexisted with the Indigenous peoples are what we know as Acadians.

Eglise Sainte-Marie
Interior - Eglise Sainte-Marie

Located on the South West part of Nova Scotia, between Digby and Yarmouth is 35 miles of coastal villages that make up the Acadian French Shore. The area is called Clare and you know you have arrived, driving along the Evangeline Trail, when you start to spot all the French signage and the beautiful churches including North America’s tallest wooden building, the Église Sainte-Marie which is located in Church Point. 

 

It is always encouraged while visiting any place, to experience the local cuisine and a dish known to the Acadians is a potato dish called râpure. The creamy texture–similar to that of cream of wheat– is tasty and a bit unusual for those who have never had it. At La Cuisine Robicheau, they offer a sample portion of râpure for first timers trying it just in case you decide it’s just not for you. 

Le Petit Robicheau
Dinner - Cuisine Robicheau

Continue driving along Highway 1 towards Meteghan and make a stop at Sip Café where they offer a range of coffees, teas and sandwiches, salads, soups and pastries. Sip Café is the perfect stop before venturing to Mavillette Beach Provincial Park. 

 

The scenic drive continues on to Yarmouth, the largest town within this district. It is in this area that you will find the darkest skies and brightest stars in Nova Scotia, making it the ultimate destination for stargazers.

Mavillette Beach Provincial Park
Ocean view - Mavillette Beach Provincial Park

By Aleyah Solomon